New York Bar Exam Results

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The New York Board of Bar Examiners provide the New York Bar Exam results by emailing written pass or fail notices to all applicants on the same day.  On that day, the New York bar examiners provide a “private results lookup screen” for all applicants to see, online, whether they passed or failed the New York bar exam.  The next day, the New York bar examiners post a public list of results including every successful applicant on the websites of the New York bar examiners and the New York Law Journal.

When are the New York Bar Exam Results Released?

Although the New York bar examiners have not specified a particular date for release of the New York bar exam results, traditionally the New York bar examiners release the February results in mid-May and the July results in mid-November. The results are released on the Board’s website.

Results Providing Admission to the New York Bar

The New York Board of Admissions will certify you for admission to the New York Bar if the you have:

  • attained a passing score on the Uniform Bar Exam (UBE),
  • successfully completed the 15-hour online New York Law Course (NYLC) in New York-specific law,
  • successfully completed the 2-hour online, open book, New York Law Exam (NYLE); and
  • successfully passed the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).

If you have not provided any of the last three of those four results, then the New York bar examiners will provide you with written notice.  Usually, the New York Board of Admissions certifies applicants on a weekly basis.  It is crucial that you have a current address on file with the Board of Admissions in order to be certified to the correct department of the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Courts, upon receipt of your results.  Additional requirements that the you must fulfill to obtain admission to the New York Bar include having:

  • satisfied the New York character and fitness requirements,
  • performed 50 hours of pro bono (i.e., free) legal services, and
  • fulfilled the New York Skills Competency Requirement.